Home

Welcome to the blog for the Wilberforce Institute at the University of Hull. Well known for our work on historical and contemporary slavery, we are also developing our research interests in the area of children’s exploitation. We hope to use this virtual platform to share with you our ideas, our activities, and our outputs as they develop.  If you would like to know more, please contact Dr Judith Spicksley on Judith.Spicksley@hull.ac.uk, or subscribe below.

You will find details of what’s coming up shortly on the ‘Events’ tab above, and a list of all our events for this academic year on the ‘Lecture Programme’ tab.

Latest from the Blog

Fieldwork: a time to learn from the ‘lived experiences of children and families’ in tea and tobacco communities

Malawi is an agriculture-based economy where tea and tobacco contribute about 70% of total annual export earnings, 60% of which comes from tobacco alone. As one of the countries that ratified the International Labour Organisation’s (ILO) Convention 138 on Minimum Age of Employment, and Convention 182 on Worst Forms of Child Labour, the Malawi Government has put in place policies and legal instruments to operationalise its international obligations and committed itself to combat child labour. (…)

‘This is the first blues I no doubt heard in my life’: The role of African-American GIs in introducing Britain to Blues Music

On 31st March 2013, the BBC broadcasted a documentary entitled ‘Blues Britannia: Can Blue Men Play the Whites?’, outlining the rise of blues music in late 1950s and early 1960s Britain. Featuring interviews with the likes of the Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards, Jack Bruce from Cream and Mick Fleetwood of Fleetwood Mac, the programme provided several reasons as to why the genre became so popular. (…)

Mothers with lived experience of modern slavery

When we consider life after modern slavery, we should not only consider survival, but also the prospect of survivors having opportunities to become thriving members of society. My research focuses on women and young persons who have left situations of modern slavery in the UK, and I have recently commenced fieldwork, speaking to women as well as practitioners who support them. (…)